Class Warfare?

Are the rich the enemy?

Two articles stuck out to me this morning as I perused all the news and views Google feels fit to display, one about Disneyland and the other more, um, obvious.

Frank Rich in the New York Times spends a plethora of paragraphs going on about how the up by the bootstraps mentality of America is under attack and in serious danger of slipping completely away. And according to Mr. Rich a particular group of people at primarily to blame. But you don’t get to find out the villains until the very end and for most of the article you get the idea Mr. Rich is simply in a mood for memories in “Who Killed The Disneyland Dream“.

CNN took a slightly different tack starting with their headline “Gap Between Rich And Middle Class Grows: The Rich Are Much Richer Than You And Me“. You pretty much get the drift of the author, Chris Isidore’s, point just from that lead.

I get that Messrs. Rich and Isidore are jealous and that they are not above using their positions of penned power to shoot barbs at their favorite enemies. But I was a bit more interested in the timing.

Wasn’t it just two weeks ago we were hearing ad nauseum about tax breaks for the rich? Weren’t many in Washington pushing to shaft the rich with significant tax increases (pushing to extend current tax policy when the alternative is that taxes would increase doesn’t count as a “cut”, it’s the status quo)?

Methinks Isidore and Rich are sore losers who, recognizing the new powers in Washington D.C. are less friendly to their preferred Robin Hood methods of taxation, are intent on stirring up the waters of class envy and economic strife against those who, ironically, are the ones most capable of getting us out of this mess their pals greatly assisted in getting us into.

Not that “the rich” are saints. But many of “the rich” Washington wants to rob are the small business owners that make up the vast majority of the economic muscle of the US of A. And to take from them is to take our jobs and our future.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Book Review: Same Kind Of Different As Me

Same Kind Of Different As Me

What do an affluent art dealer and man raised in what was essentially 20th-century slavery have in common?

I don’t know either.

But God did, and in this true story of two men for whom being from different sides of the railroad tracks didn’t begin to describe the gulf between them we see Him working His will to bring each of these men into the fullness of His goals for them.

Same Kind Of Different As Me tells the story of Denver Moore, a man raised in extreme poverty as a share-cropper in the American south, and Ron Hall, a man of self-made wealth who didn’t have a problem money couldn’t fix. Brought together by Ron’s wife and her work in a Dallas-area homeless shelter, what began as Ron’s begrudging and prideful helping out became a bond between these two that carried them through storms of life many of us have not faced.

I cried reading this book, which doesn’t happen often. But more than the emotional depth of the story was the truth that we are not as different as we may think. I see people on the trains riding to and from work and I think “what could I have in common with them?” Then memories of this book come to me and I think “if Denver and Ron were brought together, I should not doubt there may be some common purpose here as well”.

Enhanced by Zemanta