Short Reflections On The Nature Of God

What is the nature of God?
What is the nature of God?

It can be said that it is easier to accurately define and completely understand the concept of infinite that to even begin to comprehend God. Something I have wondered about for quite some time is how did God decide what the 10 Commandments were to consist of? Did He arbitrarily decide that these 10 rules were the ones He’d support? Are they so practical because He said so? If so, even despite their correctness and practicality in practice, their necessesity in all productive human interaction, they’re still arbitrary, and it would seem that God is cheaper than He really is. But God is not arbitrary. Just as He gives purpose to everything and everyone, He Himself embodies purpose. For us it is His will that guides our purpose, for Him, there is no higher being to guide His purpose. He is self-contained, unneeding. Instead it is His nature that defines His purpose. God is truthful, therefore we ought not lie. God does not covet (though, arguably He has nothing to covet, all things belong to Him, and anything existing apart from Him is against His nature), therefore we ought not covet. The 10 Commandments are Gods best portrait of Himself in the form of His basic will for us. God’s attributes are to be our goals.

Nothing true can contradict the nature of God. This is the most powerful argument we have against falsehood in the church and among believers. If it is against the nature of God, it is not true. And the admonition that we dwell on whatever things are true takes on a whole new meaning.

God is jealous. He can bear no equals, whether percieved or actual. God does not accept any sin in any form, no matter the reason. Men can only see the outside, the physical manifestations, the actions. But God knows the hearts of all mankind, He judges intentions. This is both a relief and a burden. There are actions that are misunderstood and maligned, causing pain and suffering to the actors, but which stem faithfully from correct intentions. There are actions hailed as heroic, but which stem from motives unpure, capricious at best and malicious at worst. God is the Just Judge and He will determine the reward or punishment.

Voltaire said: “It took 12 men to start Christianity, and one will destroy it.” He was referring to himself. God replies: “All flesh is like grass, and all its glory like the flower of grass. The grass withers and the flower falls off, but the Word of the Lord endures forever. (1 Peter 1:24-25 NASB)” And Voltaire died, and Christianity continues.

Why is the battle so fiercely arrayed against the Christian standing firm in their convictions, faith, and belief? Because we have the Word, Christ in us, and “the word of God is living and active and sharper than any two-edged sword, and piercing as far as the division of soul and spirit, of both joints and marrow, and able to judge the thoughts and intentions of the heart. And there is no creature hidden from His sight, but all things are open and laid bare to the eyes of Him with whom we have to do. (Hebrews 4:12-13)”

2 thoughts on “Short Reflections On The Nature Of God”

  1. Nicely done dude.

    I guess I thought about the 10 commandments for a second. lol. I thought of it and realized those commandments are that which man has the greatest propensity to NOT do. I mean look at Cain and Able. Look at David and his affair. They are very practical and to the point because Israel was so stiff-necked. Additionally they are profoundly complex as Jesus pointed out and not so black and white. For example the commandment to hold the Sabbath holy. Jesus was accused of breaking the day by healing and such but he replied first that he was the lord over the day and secondly the day was made for man, not the other way around and so it really was to man’s benefit to take the day off, not the benefit for God. Some 300 laws were derived from the ten commandments, yet Jesus summed them up in two!

    As for that piece called Voltaire. He’s rolling in his grave because his printed press, after his death, was used to print thousands of Bibles and spread the knowledge of Christianity. Considering that God created logic, words, science, math, etc, you can’t use it to disprove God as inevitably you find Him. In science there is obvious design/order and thus a creator; psalms speaks of this. In logic, you must presuppose such a being as god to believe that words and word orders have any meaning. Its really apart of Dr. Bahnsen’s defense of the transcendental argument; you should look it up.

  2. Nicely done dude.

    I guess I thought about the 10 commandments for a second. lol. I thought of it and realized those commandments are that which man has the greatest propensity to NOT do. I mean look at Cain and Able. Look at David and his affair. They are very practical and to the point because Israel was so stiff-necked. Additionally they are profoundly complex as Jesus pointed out and not so black and white. For example the commandment to hold the Sabbath holy. Jesus was accused of breaking the day by healing and such but he replied first that he was the lord over the day and secondly the day was made for man, not the other way around and so it really was to man’s benefit to take the day off, not the benefit for God. Some 300 laws were derived from the ten commandments, yet Jesus summed them up in two!

    As for that piece called Voltaire. He’s rolling in his grave because his printed press, after his death, was used to print thousands of Bibles and spread the knowledge of Christianity. Considering that God created logic, words, science, math, etc, you can’t use it to disprove God as inevitably you find Him. In science there is obvious design/order and thus a creator; psalms speaks of this. In logic, you must presuppose such a being as god to believe that words and word orders have any meaning. Its really apart of Dr. Bahnsen’s defense of the transcendental argument; you should look it up.

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