Dog Becomes Disenfranchised Voter

Milard Fillmore Comic on Seattle Voter Rolls

Two years ago in Washington state, the unthinkable happened. The Republican gubernatorial candidate won, but by only a thousand or so votes. Some counties conducted re-counts to ensure the accuracy of their totals. King County, Seattle, conducted two or three re-counts, each time finding more and more votes for the Democratic candidate. Eventually, the Democratic candidate won by 120 votes.

Obviously, the losing party challenged votes and investigated for fraud, etc. More than 500 votes were found to have been cast illegally, but the various city, state and federal prosecutors refrained from conducting any serious investigations.

In protest of the callous indifference displayed by King County election officials (who ideologically sided with the Democratic winner), Jane K. Balogh, a 66 year old Federal Way resident, registered Duncan M. McDonald, her Australian shepherd-terrier mix to vote using a mail-in form last April.

Duncan was mailed a ballot in November and she returned it with “VOID” written across the face and signed with a paw print.

Election officials noticed the odd ballot and called Jane who admitted to the scheme, but Duncan remained a registered voter and was sent another ballot for an election in May.

Duncan was finally removed from the voter rolls three weeks after Jane was charged in King County Superior Court for “making a false or misleading statement to a public servant,” which is a misdemeanor, and “for filling out the false voter registration.”

A county investigator said the owner contended that Duncan was eligible because

    He is an American citizen,
    Was born in the United States,
    Is over 18 years old (in dog years) and
    Has never been convicted of a felony.

The county prosecutor’s office offered to charge Balogh only with a misdemeanor and to agree to a sentencing recommendation of a one-year deferred sentence, a year of probation, 10 hours of community service and a $250 fine if she pleads guilty. If she doesn’t, the prosecutor’s office will charge her with a felony.”

After vigorously prosecuting this 66-year old, the county prosecutor should investigate ACORN for submitting 1,800 apparently fraudulent registrations after the registration deadline. The registrations contained forged signatures and often identical addresses.

6 thoughts on “Dog Becomes Disenfranchised Voter”

  1. I find this scary and worrisome – Maryland no exception from Voter Fraud. We had an awful display of fraud during one of our governor elections. Massive accounts of laws were broken against a wonderful candidate, and when it was brought before a judge he wouldn’t even hear the evidence. It really makes you think.

    I understand in Australia that voting is mandatory. After reading your blog here, I am beginning to think that might not be a bad idea – everyone is registered as soon as they are of age. Could be less fraud that way?

  2. I think we ought to tie voting registration and the tax system. You pay your taxes, you get a receipt or code that you have to bring in to your voting place or include with your absentee ballot. This will keep people cognizant of the nature of government as a taker, as well as providing some additional security and accountability in the system.

    The biggest issue in these cases though is the human nature of the judges who refused to be the impartial arbiters of justice they ought to have been. Such judges ought to have complaints filed against them and face inquiries.

  3. Well that is where Sauerbrey met her defeat, in the courts.

    Ellen Sauerbrey became an unwilling expert on election fraud following her 1994 bid to become Maryland’s governor, which she lost to Democrat Parris Glendening. All during election night as precincts reported in, Sauerbrey remained ahead. Then, close to midnight, results started pouring in from precincts in Baltimore City, giving Glendening a 5,993-vote victory. It was the closest race in Maryland in 70 years.

    To this day, Sauerbrey and her running mate, former Howard County police chief Paul Rappaport, believe the election was stolen by Democratic party operatives who stuffed ballot boxes and altered voting machines after the polls were closed.

    Sauerbrey’s failed challenge of the 1994 election results dragged through the courts for more than six months, and her opponents accused her of being a sore loser.

    Drake Ferguson, a private investigator who headed a volunteer group that helped document Sauerbrey’s allegations of voter fraud, found that 75 percent of Baltimore City’s 408 precincts had “severe flaws” in election-day records, including election cards that were either unsigned or had names different from the printed name on them.

    The group also claimed that 5,832 more votes were tallied in Baltimore City than there were voters who checked in at precincts or cast absentee ballots — mirroring Glendening’s election margin almost exactly. They found that keys to voting machines had been duplicated, and that some people had voted more than once. Sauerbrey even remembers investigators reporting back to her that they had traced the addresses listed by scores of Baltimore City voters to boarded-up houses and to vacant lots.

    But Glendening’s appointee to head the state board of elections, Linda Lamone, rejected Sauerbrey’s allegations of fraud, noting that a Democratic trial court judge and the state attorney general, also a Democrat, had found they had “no merit.”

    Asked whether Maryland had a problem with voter fraud, Lamone said, “No, I do not think there is a problem.”

    From World Net Daily Article » http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=20223

  4. Matthew

    In a way, this is what happened to the federal prosecutors that Bush fired. Supposedly, voter fraud may have been part of the reason these attorneys were fired.

    “The supposed scandal this week is that Mr. Bush had been informed last fall that some U.S. Attorneys had been less than vigorous in pursuing voter-fraud cases and that the President had made the point to Attorney General Alberto Gonzales.”

    http://www.opinionjournal.com/editorial/feature.html?id=110009784

    Firing US attorneys is permissible, though uncommon, because they are political appointees and as such, are “at will” employees. Clinton fired all 93 U.S. Attorneys in March 1993.

    So you can probably assume that impeaching judges who refuse to be impartial arbiters of the law, particularly with regard to voter fraud, could end you up in a hot seat, maybe a Congressional hot seat.

  5. Well in the courts is where she met her defeat:

    Ellen Sauerbrey became an unwilling expert on election fraud following her 1994 bid to become Maryland’s governor, which she lost to Democrat Parris Glendening. All during election night as precincts reported in, Sauerbrey remained ahead. Then, close to midnight, results started pouring in from precincts in Baltimore City, giving Glendening a 5,993-vote victory. It was the closest race in Maryland in 70 years.

    To this day, Sauerbrey and her running mate, former Howard County police chief Paul Rappaport, believe the election was stolen by Democratic party operatives who stuffed ballot boxes and altered voting machines after the polls were closed.

    Sauerbrey’s failed challenge of the 1994 election results dragged through the courts for more than six months, and her opponents accused her of being a sore loser.

    Drake Ferguson, a private investigator who headed a volunteer group that helped document Sauerbrey’s allegations of voter fraud, found that 75 percent of Baltimore City’s 408 precincts had “severe flaws” in election-day records, including election cards that were either unsigned or had names different from the printed name on them.

    The group also claimed that 5,832 more votes were tallied in Baltimore City than there were voters who checked in at precincts or cast absentee ballots — mirroring Glendening’s election margin almost exactly. They found that keys to voting machines had been duplicated, and that some people had voted more than once. Sauerbrey even remembers investigators reporting back to her that they had traced the addresses listed by scores of Baltimore City voters to boarded-up houses and to vacant lots.

    But Glendening’s appointee to head the state board of elections, Linda Lamone, rejected Sauerbrey’s allegations of fraud, noting that a Democratic trial court judge and the state attorney general, also a Democrat, had found they had “no merit.”

    Asked whether Maryland had a problem with voter fraud, Lamone said, “No, I do not think there is a problem.”

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